Category Archives: Eighteenth century

WW2 Dutch and 1745 Jacobites

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It might have been quiet here on the blog for the last week or so, but I have actually been  progressing with all sorts of stuff. My wargaming table is groaning under the weight of several projects on the go!

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My WW2 Dutch army is coming along.  I am in the throes of assembling and painting some anti-tank artillery. These intricate little models were released recently by May ’40 Miniatures. Along with the Landsverk armoured car, my Dutch army will soon pack at least a wee bit of punch.

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I’ve also been busy with my scissors cutting out paper soldiers for my ‘45 Jacobite Rebellion project. I’ve now got enough units on each side to play a game. The Paperboys figures even come with a set of simple rules, so it’ll be interesting to try them out.

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This British cavalry regiment looks pretty impressive, even though it just made out of paper.

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The armies even include paper artillery. The guns themselves are 3D models, and are a bit fiddly to make. The gunners and their tools are all flats. This close-up view perhaps doesn’t do these paper soldiers justice – but they do look simply splendid when looking at them from a little more of a distance.

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The book of Paperboys figures also includes 3D terrain, so I’ve built a typical Scottish ‘big house’. You can build this in any sort of configuration you want, so I chose to do a main building with a wing on the back, and a circular staircase turret.

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Filed under Eighteenth century, May 40, Paperboys, Uncategorized, WW2

Five large 28mm regiments in eight days

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Yes, in just eight days I have produced five full units in my experiment with Peter Dennis’s wonderful paper soldiers. My British army already has three large units, and my Jacobites are well underway with two units. That’s less than two days per unit, from start to finish, including basing.

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With any other project using my more-usual metal figures, I’d have to include the word ‘slowly’ (as in ‘I’ve been slowly building up my 28mm WW2 Dutch army‘). But for the Jacobite Rebellion of 1745/6, I can use the word ‘rapidly’ instead!

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I thought cutting out the figures would be fiddly and frustrating. But in fact I find it quite zen-like. Cutting-out shapes seems to have the same calming effect as those mindfulness colouring-in books!

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I’m building the two opposing armies at the same time, so I’m fixing their flags to fly in opposite directions. This may sound odd – until you remember that on the table the armies will face each other, so then the flags will be flying the same way. It would look odd if the wind was blowing in the complete opposite direction for each army!

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I’ve given figures quite thick bases to make them easier to pick up. I’ve  textured them very simply with static grass. Anything more than that might be too 3D to accompany the 2D figures.

This weekend I’m going to work on some cavalry and guns.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Filed under Eighteenth century, Paperboys, Uncategorized

Paper Highlanders for “The ’45”

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My paper armies have doubled in two days, with the first Highlander unit to face the regiment of British troops I made up earlier in the week. This Paperboys unit was begun from scratch yesterday, and completed tonight (around 100 x 28mm figures!).

I even had time to make up command stands for Bonnie Prince Charlie and his opponent, the Duke of Cumberland.

I just need figures for Jamie and Claire Fraser!

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Filed under Eighteenth century, Paperboys, Uncategorized

Four hours to make a 112-figure regiment in 28mm!

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Yep, just somewhere between three and four hours to complete a regiment of 112 figures,  from go to whoa, including flags and basing!

I posted last week that I was going to try out some of Peter Dennis’s paper figures for a change from my usual metal. This 28mm British regiment was my first attempt, and I’m pretty darn pleased with how it came out.

From the front and back, they look pretty impressive. In fact, at a glance you’d be hard put to tell them from metal or plastic figures. This illusion even remains when seen from an angle, but obviously a side-on view gives it away. However, most wargames are seen from front or behind, so that’s not a problem.

Construction was a lot simpler than I thought it would be. As per the instructions, I copied the figures onto 100 gram paper, which is 20 grams heavier than normal photocopy paper. Before any cutting took place, I held the sheet upside-down to a light and dabbed some PVA glue onto wherever I could see the back of any muskets, swords or pole-arms – this strengthens them.

Gluing the figures together goes really well with UHU All Purpose glue (though Peter warns you not to use UHU Multi-Purpose glue, which must be different). The figures are grouped in a sort of concertina pattern which you fold up to make the three ranks.

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Cutting out – which was the part I was a bit nervous about – was much easier than I expected. The first few figures were a bit painstaking, but once I found my rhythm, I was away laughing. I used a small pair of scissors, and turned the paper in my hand to cut around all the detail. It still leaves a bit of a white edge, but that adds an outline which I think makes the figures ‘pop’.

I ummed and ahhed about doing any basing effect. I see most people generally don’t. However, I decided to just use a simple application of PVA glue and static grass to give a bit of texture.

The figures, being made of two layers of 100 gram paper glued together, are like very light card. But they are surprisingly strong. And even if a bayonet or two does tear off in play, they’ll be dead easy to replace.

Next effort in a few days will be a unit of charging highlander Jacobite rebels. Och aye!

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Filed under Eighteenth century, Paperboys, Uncategorized

I’m going to try out paper soldiers

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I’ve decided to try something different – paper armies! For the last couple of years I’ve been keeping my eye on the rapidly growing range of books that Peter Dennis has been pumping out, each one covering a different campaign using 2D paper soldiers and scenery.

After having enjoyed so much making some Dutch houses out of cardboard, I finally decided to give these paper figures a go. So I ordered two books to try out, covering a couple of periods I’ve always fancied, but couldn’t face starting to collect and paint from scratch: the Jacobite ’45 Rebellion, and the American Revolution.

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Actually, this isn’t the first time I’ve played with paper soldiers. Many, many years ago (er, many decades ago), my then-flatmate Alan Hollows drew and cut out two Seven Years War paper armies, using a whimsical style reminiscent of Asterix the Gaul. I wonder if any New Zealand readers still have photos of these wonderful home-made figures?

Anyway, back to the Peter Dennis books.  On receiving my package in the post today, I was very pleasantly surprised to see the books were choc-a-bloc with not only every type of figure you would need for both sides, but also flags, artillery, carts, casualties, markers, appropriate buildings and trees, and even two sets of wargames rules (beginner and advanced versions). Wow!

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You can see the quality of the artwork from the illustrations I’ve reproduced here. The fronts and backs are carefully designed to line up.

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Peter has developed an innovative concertina folding system that enables you to  produce stands with multiple ranks of figures. Have a look at this video of how to assemble these figures:

But please don’t try assembling the sample images from my blog – my camerawork will have put them out of alignment … and, anyway, you should buy the book!

I’m told the finished figures are very sturdy, despite being made out of paper. You can literally throw them into a box after a game, give it a good shake, and they’ll still come out good as new next time you play!

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Apparently the 2D effect works well in wargames, as the players generally stand on each side of the table anyway. I’ll be intrigued to see how this works in real-life – but the photos in the book are very promising.

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Anyway, I’m going to enjoy trying to build my first army over the next few days. But even if I were never to cut the figures out, these books are simply beautiful to look at in themselves!

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I’m also really excited that later this year Peter will be publishing a book for the War of the Spanish Succession – another colourful period I’ve always fancied, but couldn’t face starting.

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He’s also coming out with a book of (3D) buildings for eighteenth-century Europe. I’ve pre-ordered both books already!

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Filed under American War of Independence, Eighteenth century, Paperboys, Uncategorized

Newly released trailer for ‘Barry Lyndon’

Just as vibrant and urgent as it was when it debuted in 1975, Stanley Kubrick’s Barry Lyndon is perhaps the perfect historical epic movie to be re-introduced to a brand new audience.

In advance of the July 2016 re-release of the film in the UK,  a new trailer has been crafted for the film, one that builds in a contemporary feel without sacrificing the film’s authenticity.

Only a cinema screen can do justice to the stunning visuals of Barry Lyndon. Inspired by painters such as Thomas Gainsborough and William Hogarth, the film has a beautiful, painterly look, enhanced by filming in natural or historically accurate light sources.

My particular interest, of course, is that the miniature army of my ‘imagi-nation’, the Barryat of Lyndonia, is made up of the various units that appear in the movie, including Gale’s Regiment of Foot, the Régiment de Royal-Cravates, and the ‘Kubrick’ Infanterie Regiment.

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The British contingent of the army of the Barryat of Lyndonia: Gale’s Regiment of Foot (28mm Minden Miniatures figures, GMB flags).

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The French contingent of the army of the Barryat of Lyndonia: the Régiment de Royal-Cravates (28mm Minden Miniatures figures, GMB flags).

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The Prussian contingent of the army of the Barryat of Lyndonia: the ‘Kubrick’ Infanterie Regiment (28mm Minden Miniatures figures, GMB flags).

 

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Filed under Eighteenth century, Minden Miniatures, Movies, Uncategorized

Trees, trees, trees …

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If you go down to the woods today …

I’ve been upgrading my wargames trees, to add to my existing rather shonky stock of greenery.

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My old homemade trees can be seen in the background of the photo below, the new ones in various stages of basing at the front.

I bought these trees off eBay from China, at ridiculously low prices. Even the shipping from China to New Zealand cost less than if I were to post a standard letter to the next city. How this company makes money, I don’t know – but I’m not complaining!

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These trees come without bases, so I bought some large square metal washers, and with liberal use of hot glue, liquid nails, and my usual sand-and-PVA-glue mix, they seem to have attached well. I also added some sprigs of plastic Christmas decorative bracken to some of the bases.

Whilst most of these trees came in perfectly OK shades of green, there were a few that were a little bit too vivid for my taste. But with some dark green clothes dye, it was a simple and satisfying process to fix them.

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Some of the trees are conifers, as in the above picture.  Others (as seen in the pictures further up this page) are deciduous tree.

As you can see, all in all they make a perfectly idyllic grove for my 18th century couples to frolic together!

Here’s the eBay page page where I found these trees.  I bought mine from several of the dealers listed, but they are much the same. You can scroll down each listing to find the details of size – they range quite a bit in height, so you need to select ones that’ll suit your scale.

 

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Filed under Eighteenth century, Terrain, Uncategorized