A town during the Peninsular War

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Over the last month or so I’ve been busy making a number of buildings from Florian Richter and Peter Dennis’s wonderful book European Buildings: 28mm paper models for 18th & 19th century wargames.

You simply cut these buildings out of the book, and then fold and glue them together. I did add some  inner strengthening with heavy card to make them more sturdy, but otherwise my models are straight from the book.

Today I set them all out on my wargames table, along with some existing scratch-built buildings (top centre) and a few commercial models (top left).

You can click on the above picture (and also all the other pics in this posting) if you want to see these models in more detail.

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Here’s the main street, with a walled house and stables on the left, and a church with some porticoed houses on the right. The walled house is designed for a northern European setting, but I think works perfectly well for the Peninsular War.

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The town has a beautiful chateau, which I’ve given a walled garden. In front you can again see the walled house (left), and the same building on the right made up as a free-standing inn.

You can also see both the paper churches in this picture – the Spansh-style one in the foreground, and the more northern European church in the background.

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I particularly like the watermill. It again is probably more suitable for northern Europe, but fits well here too.

On the other side of the street are a range of various houses, some with arched porches. By glueing on different doors and windows, you can make various versions of the same building, as you can see with the two porticoed houses.

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These buildings have of course been specifically designed by Florian and Peter to accompany the Paperboys range of paper model soldiers, like these 18th century British infantry. But I wanted to see what they would look like with 28mm metal figures, so …

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… here comes a battalion of Front Rank Portuguese infantry marching into town.

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Whilst the figures are a slightly bigger scale than the buildings, they look fine together.

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The Portuguese deploy into line in a field behind a 3-storey balconied house. Again, the slight difference in scales looks fine.

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Meanwhile, a section of Portuguese Cacadores takes on white-coated French infantry in the town square.

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Hmm, I think I know these two chaps standing in the gateway of a walled house.

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The sound of rumbling wheels and jingling harnesses echo from the walls of the narrow street, as British artillery trundle through the town.

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A French staff officer gallops past a row of houses to deliver important messages.

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A French officer rides up the driveway of the local chateau.

So, as you can see from the above photos, these buildings will work perfectly well for wargaming with both 2D paper soldiers and fully-rounded 28mm figures.

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3 thoughts on “A town during the Peninsular War

  1. Hi Roly, the slightly mixed scale of the figures and buildings works well. Good job 🙂

    I think if we use true scales buildings they dwarf our figures and the perspective looks wrong. I read in the Airfix 50th anniversary book that different parts of kit sets are not to scale for the same reason. For example, small fittings like handles, hinges etc are made oversize. If they are to scale they look flimsy and too small. We see with our minds and create our own “pictures” in our heads.

I hope I've given you something to think about - please do leave a comment with your thoughts or reactions.

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