The Enfield Conspiracy

enfield

I’ve just found out that an old police colleague of mine has written a novel set in the Indian Mutiny and the New Zealand Wars.  Ken Brewer’s book The Enfield Conspiracy is available on Amazon here:

http://www.amazon.com/The-Enfield-Conspiracy-Ken-Brewer/dp/1592324002

I haven’t read the book yet (after all, I only found out about it a couple of hours ago!).  But I’ll be ordering it, as it covers a military period I’m interested in.  

This novel is apparently going to lead on to sequels in which the hero eventually becomes a New Zealand policeman.  I think a colonial whodunnit series based on real history will be terrific.    

During the 1980s, when the New Zealand Police was celebrating its centenary, Ken and I both wrote non-fiction books on the history of our respective police districts.  In today’s belt-tightening financial climate, it is hard to believe that serving police officers were once given time to research and write books!

We were both members of the small police contingent who took part in the Treaty of Waitangi reenactment back in 1990.  So we spent quite some time together immersed in New Zealand history, as seen in the pic below (that’s Ken on the far right, and me on the far left – click to enlarge the picture).

at-sea

I haven’t seen Ken for some years, so hope to renew acquaintanceship with him, now that I see our common interest in history has progressed in his case to novel-writing.   This is something I dearly would have loved to do myself, though I don’t think I’m enough of a natural story-teller.

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5 Comments

Filed under Books, Colonial New Zealand Wars

5 responses to “The Enfield Conspiracy

  1. Hi Roly. Thanks for your support, getting any book off the ground is always fraught with difficulty although this one seems to have created a life of it’s own. It has recently been taken up by Whitcoulls and on Tuesday (3rd Apr) I received a call to advise it had arrived on the shelves in the Auckland Queen St. branch, when I got there an hour later they had sold out! They can order more. Best wishes. Ken Brewer.

    • That’s great news. And I gather it had a flying start on Amazon, too. Well done!

      I bought the Kindle version this afternoon, but next time I pass Whitcoulls I’ll pop into see if I can get the actual paperback.

  2. I’ll definitely have to grab a copy of ‘The Enfield Conspiracy’ from my local Whitcoulls, thanks for the recommendation!

    I’m a long time fan of the ‘Sharpe’ series and other fictional works set during the Napoleonic period and have often felt that the conflicts of the mid-19th century are often overlooked settings for a good yarn. Look forward to reading it.

    Incidentally, earlier this year while researching an old photo-postcard I came across the remarkable story of an Ensign who was the force that relieved Lucknow. After the Indian Mutiny he moved to the Chatham Islands of all places where he lived out his days as a sheep farmer.

    http://historygeek.co.nz/2013/02/05/earliest-known-photograph-of-a-new-zealand-tornado/

    • Yes, I read (and enjoyed) that posting of yours.

      There are a few mid-19th century series of novels around, but none that have so far grabbed me as much as ‘Sharpe’ from the earlier Napoleonic period.

      Problem is that more often than not military history novels are written either by military historians who are light on story-telling, or story-tellers who are light on military history. But get an author talented in both areas, and I’m in for a good read!

  3. Pingback: That was the year that was | DRESSING THE LINES

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