Truchseß dragoons join the Barryat of Lyndonia

“The dragoons will advance!”  The latest regiment to join my 18th century imagi-nation, the Barryat of Lyndonia, are these dragoons based on the real-life Prussian Truchseß dragoon regiment.  Click on the above picture to get the full effect.

The Barryat of Lyndonia is based on the movie Barry Lyndon, of course.  This new regiment is the first unit in the Lyndonian army that veers away from the movie, though.  I’ve mentioned in a previous posting the unscientific method I used when I chose to replicate the pink and light-blue uniform colours of the Truchseß dragoons:

Because when I met my wife back in the 80s, pink and light-blue were the ‘in’ colours – she not only wore (very attractively, I might add) pink and light-blue eye-shadow, but we painted our first house together with pink and light-blue trim.  Despite being well out of fashion now, I still have a fondness of that colour combination, so how could I resist a unit dressed in light-blue uniforms with pink facings?!

The regiment currently is made up of 24 figures –  two officers, one drummer and one standard bear (all based singly) and two squadrons of 10 troopers (based in pairs).  I plan to add a couple more troopers to each squadron, as I’m finding 10 an unsatifying number for arranging my regiment in symmetrical formations!  Note that I don’t organise my regiments  in any historical way – they are merely for playing fun wargames, not simulating history.

And before anyone asks, I don’t base to suit any particular set of rules.  Any rules I will use have to be able to cope with my basing, not the other way round!

The figures are all 28mm Minden Miniatures (the most exquisite 18th century figures around, in my opinion).  The standard is merely printed out from a lovely picture on the Kronosaf website.

The horses were under-coated with rust-coloured car primer, then rubbed with burnt umber or black oil paint.  This oil paint used to belong to my Dad, who passed away in 1984, so it imbues my figures with a touch of personal memories, and also shows you how long oil paint lasts!   Oh, and I had some expert help on painting horses, who is  seen inspecting the results in the picture below.

All the above photos were taken on my mobile phone, as our digital camera is presently on holiday in the United Kingdom with my wife and daughter.  While the picture quality isn’t as clear as with a camera, the photos have turned out adequate enough.

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11 Comments

Filed under Eighteenth century, Minden Miniatures

11 responses to “Truchseß dragoons join the Barryat of Lyndonia

  1. Scott Bowman

    They look tremendous, I can hear their hooves from here!

  2. Thanks, Scott – they’ve been an awful long time in the painting!

  3. For a second,there, I thought the first photo was from the film, they are so realistic. I wish I was half as good, then my Mindens might be worth showing. More please.

  4. Thanks for that, Ian. I was really pleased with that photo too – it was good luck that everything came together in terms of the light, angle, sky effect etc, as there is not much I can do to influence the picture with a simple phone camera!!

  5. Fabulous dragoon regiment, first photo is very realistic
    – Allan

  6. Thanks, Allan – it did come out quite realistic, didn’t it. The angle and sky came out just right.

  7. Agree – fantastic effect!

  8. Thanks for that, Mark. Hopefully they can grace the table when I join the club!

  9. Yes, extremely pretty in the mot manly way, of course!

    Best Regards,

    Stokes Schwartz

    • Thanks for that, Stokes. Pretty is not a word I would have normally used for a bunch of hardened dragoons, but …

      Roly (who is wearing a manly pink shirt to work today to commemorate Breast Cancer Awareness Day)

  10. Pingback: Rococo cavalcade -18th century dragoons on parade | DRESSING THE LINES

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